Cyber Range Updates

April 2, 2021 

Hey folks, 

This week’s new challenges are no joke. They have been specially chosen for you to help keep your Red Team skills sharp. You’ll find challenges related to recon, cryptography, reverse engineering, and forensics. 

Good luck and have fun! 

The Cyber Range Team 

P.S. If you’re not already signed up for the BHIS Antisyphon Cyber Range, the following page has screenshots, info, and, of course, a link where you can sign up and join in the fun: https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/   


One-line commands can be handy tools. 
Not all hashes are created equal. See if you can crack this one.
Converting location data into useful information is handy in a lot of engagements.  
Using books and cryptic references is an old school way to send messages. No school like the old school! 
No actual octopi were harmed in the making of this challenge.  


March 19, 2021 

Hello folks, 

This week we have slightly tougher challenges in store for you. That means more points will be awarded for each problem and better bragging rights when you find the solutions. We wanted to give you some problems that would make your brain sweat! 

Good luck and have fun! 

The Cyber Range Team 

P.S. If you’re not already signed up for the BHIS Antisyphon Cyber Range, the following page has screenshots, info, and, of course, a link where you can sign up and join in the fun:  

https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/


Can you find the message hidden in this image? 
You may think your regex skills rock. This will reveal the truth! 
All those flashing LEDs are saying something… 
Analyze a PCAP file to figure out what the hackers did. 
SQLi is a Red Team staple. Can you find a way in without using your own (deactivated) login? 


March 5, 2021

Hey folks, 

This week’s additions to the Cyber Range have a little of this and a little of that. There’s some recon to see if your Google skills are all that, some web exploitation to see just how sneaky a spider you really are, and a dash of forensics.  

Screenshots and descriptions of this week’s new critters are below. Stay tuned for another batch of challenges in a couple of weeks.  

If you’re not already signed up for the BHIS Antisyphon Cyber Range, the following page has screenshots, info, and, of course, a link where you can sign up and join in the action:  

https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/

Good luck and have fun! 


Don’t be frightened! Using search engines to find obscure stuff is an important recon skill.  
This challenge is a test to see if you are smarter than a bot. Can you find the hidden path to treasure? 
Those who do forensics often have to scrape evidence from different kinds of files. Can you find what is hidden within some raw email text? 
Cookies are tasty! They can also help you gain access to some websites. How good are you at crunching cookies? 
Finding where a photo was taken can be extremely useful for a lot of reasons. First, find Ava’s accounts, then figure out where she had her little photoshoot. 


February 19, 2021

Howdy folks, 

This week the Cyber Range is pleased to release a collection of challenges that tackle everything from crypto to Kerberoasting! We tried to wrassle up some problems to coincide with Darin and Carrie Roberts’ class about Atomic Red Team and other really cool attack emulation tools, but rustling those challenges was more like bronco bustin’! Score 1 for the broncos. 

Not to fear! The latest batch of challenges has a little something for everyone, and we’ll keep working to corral those other varmints just as soon as we can. Until then, set your sights on these rascals.  You can find screenshots and descriptions of the new critters below. 

If you’re not already signed up for the BHIS Antisyphon Cyber Range, the following page has screenshots, info, and, of course, a link where you can sign up and join in the fun:  
https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/  

And for more info about the Roberts’ class, Attack Emulation Tools: Atomic Red Team, CALDERA and More, go here: 
https://wildwesthackinfest.com/training/attack-emulation-atomic-red-team-caldera-and-more/  

Good luck and have fun! 

This is a nice hat-tip to our friend and co-conspirator, Tim Medin. It also deals with event IDs for nefarious happenings you should be alerting on. 
Files are not always what they appear to be, and figuring out what kind of file you’re really dealing with is important, especially if you think there is monkey business afoot. 
Analyzing your Windows Registry is critical if you think someone was misbehaving on a system. Can you decode these registry keys and find the rogue executable? 
Hashes are everywhere, but there are a lot of different kinds out there. Before you can crack it, you need to know if it’s an aardvark or an armadillo. 
Hacking web applications through login forms is so common that developers sometimes flag “dangerous” words so they won’t work for attackers. Can you find a work-around? 


February 5, 2021 

Howdy folks, 

This week we are releasing five new Cyber Range problems to coincide with Kent Ickler and Jordan Drysdale’s Applied Purple Teaming training course, which started on February 2. We specifically picked problems that relate to some of the concepts and issues they cover, including the MITRE ATT&CK framework, PowerShell exploits, and enterprise OSINT awareness. You can find screenshots and descriptions of the new problems below. 

These new problems are just the latest ones we’ve released. More are in development as this goes to press, so stay tuned for the challenges yet to come. 

If you’re not already signed up for the BHIS Antisyphon Cyber Range, the following page has screenshots, info, and, of course, a link where you can sign up and join in the fun:  

https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/

Good luck and have fun! 

Exercise your Google-Fu to find the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) number for a notorious RDP bug. This is a must-have skill for any Blue Teamer! 
Knowing how to identify vulnerabilities that are already documented in the MITRE ATT&CK framework is a life-saver for anyone on a Blue Team. Test your skill at finding this vuln’s documentation. 
Red Teamers often like to “live off the land,” using PowerShell and other native tools already present on the systems they attack. Can you figure out what this command is trying to do? 
Posting a photo that shows your badge from work is a serious no-no, from a security standpoint. Can you find this image online? 
Privilege escalation is a core Red Team skill. Can you elevate your privileges on a Linux system and find the flag? 


January 22, 2021

This week we are releasing five new Cyber Range problems to get you in the mood for BB King’s upcoming class all about Modern WebApp Pentesting. These new problems address a variety of common issues found in modern websites, from plaintext passwords hidden in source code to JSON web token abuse and fun with SQL injection. You can find screenshots of the new problems below.  

If you’re not already signed up for the BHIS Antisyphon Cyber Range, the following page has screenshots, info, and, of course, a link where you can sign up and join in the fun: https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/  

For more info about BB’s class, Modern WebApp Pentesting, go here:  

https://wildwesthackinfest.com/training/modern-webapp-pentesting/

Good luck and have fun! 

HTML is what makes the world go around, and sometimes you find the darndest things hidden in the code. 
This problem seems easy, but only if you’ve got good web reflexes…
This is another example of a common, but problematic, HTML coding practice.
JSON is used in many web apps. Can you find the flaw in this one? 
Online forms are used on many websites, but sometimes they reveal more than they should. Can you get this one to tell you something that is supposed to remain secret? 


January 1, 2021

Today the Cyber Range team has released 12 new challenges! Whether you didn’t get a chance to play with Active Defense Harbinger Distribution (ADHD) at Wild West Hackin’ Fest (WWHF) or just want more exposure to the project, these challenges are for you. These challenges are a direct copy of the challenges provided in the WWHF lab, but we hope to add more as we build more labs.

To get started, check out the “Welcome to ADHD” challenge, which includes links to a relevant Black Hills Information Security (BHIS) blog post and the official ADHD documentation. If you have any questions or run into any issues, please feel free to mention @moth in the #adhd channel of BHIS’ Discord server here: https://discord.gg/TPNn833 You can check out some of the screenshots of the challenges below.

Good luck and have fun! 

Have you heard about the Antisyphon ACE-T™ certification? When you log in to the Cyber Range and navigate to the Cyber Range Core event, you can see your ACE-T™ progress, challenges, rank, and percentile, which you can share with your boss or colleagues.  



October 26, 2020

FIVE NEW PROBLEMS ADDED TO CYBER RANGE

Recently, the Cyber Range team added five new problems to the Cyber Range.

The first challenge addition is part 3 of the “Python Login Pannel” from the previous updates. In this challenge, the user is told that the web developer has gotten “smarter” and sets the challenge of gaining access once more.

The next challenge to be added is titled “Ransomeware Attack Part 1” and it tasks the user with trying to find out who is behind an “attack” on C3’s system by finding where the intruder hosted their ransomware from and finding a flag in the process.

Tune in next week for part 2 of this challenge!

The third challenge addition tasks the user with trying to get access to private API’s without paying for a subscription using a documentation for an API that only gives public API’s.

The fourth challenge asks the user to find “interesting things” within a “colorful” page in order to find the flag.

The fifth and final addition asks the user to help “read” a message that was typed up by a “friend” using a weird font.

Last but not least, the CyberRange team has created a challenge seeking the users feedback! The link to the “Feedback Survey” can also be found below!

You can find the survey here:
https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=4tsbiXT46EaOT9cTFOVsjrQh-9aaOpRBs_rWm0xXEh5URFExVVA5QVhGR0Q3MjlEUkg2RkNKWkU5QS4u

Please be sure to tune back in every two weeks for five new challenges!


For more info or to get started on the Cyber Range, please visit https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/.



September 23, 2020

FIVE NEW PROBLEMS ADDED TO CYBER RANGE

Recently, the Cyber Range team added five new problems to the Cyber Range.

The first challenge addition is part 2 of the “Python Login Pannel” from the last update. In this challenge, the user is tasked with finding the correct password to another version of a secure login.

Tune in to the next update for the 3rd and final part of this challenge!

The next challenge to be added tasks the user with analyzing a copy of the “malware” to recover a valid decryption password.

The third challenge addition tasks the user with trying to get the attention of the customer support of a company that a keyboard was purchased from.

The fourth challenge asks the user to find the original text of a “hash”, which in this case is encoded with the MD5 algorithm.

The fifth and final addition asks the user to help hackers figure out what to do with an “odd piece” of running software on an internal network.

Please be sure to tune back in every two weeks for five new challenges!


For more info or to get started on the Cyber Range, please visit https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/.



September 3, 2020

FIVE NEW PROBLEMS ADDED TO CYBER RANGE

Recently, the Cyber Range team added five new problems to the Cyber Range.

The first challenge addition is the first of a 3-part challenge. “Python Login Pannel 1” gives the user some bytecode to a poorly programmed login portal and tasks them with finding the correct password.

Tune in to the next update for part 2 of this challenge!

The next challenge to be added tasks the user with using cryptography skills to decrypt a file and find out what is in it.

The third challenge addition asks the user to figure out what IP address that a piece of malware decodes to.

The fourth challenge asks the user to look at a file, find out what kind of file it is, and then open it.

The fifth and final addition asks the user to find a bypass to “unmotivated” security protections on a given website.

Please be sure to tune back in every two weeks for five new challenges!


For more info or to get started on the Cyber Range, please visit https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/.



August 4, 2020

FIVE NEW PROBLEMS ADDED TO CYBER RANGE

Recently, the Cyber Range team added five new problems to the Cyber Range.

The first problem puts the user in the scenario of performing a physical penetration test where you have to pick a lock on an entrance to a facility:

The second problem tasks the user with connecting to a linux server and utilizing various techniques to elevate privileges to another user:

The third problem gives a task to find the flag in the root folder of a server using the link provided:

The fourth problem relates to cryptography and asks the user to decrypt the given message in order to find the flag:

The fifth and final problem tasks the user with finding the name of the type of encoding and then recovering the flag by scanning it:

Please be sure to tune back in every two weeks for five new challenges!


For more info or to get started on the Cyber Range, please visit https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/.



July 20, 2020

Five New Problems Added to Cyber Range

Recently, the Cyber Range team added five new problems to the Cyber Range.

The first problem involves using da Vinci Crypto to reverse engineer a page to unlock a cryptex:

The second problem deals with web exploitation and focuses on finding glaring security mistakes on a website:

The third problem gives a link to a site full of binary where the user is supposed to find the flag:

The fourth problem relates to forensics and asks the user to analyze a “flash drive” to search for anything of interest:

The fifth and final problem concerns penetration testing and challenges the user to connect to a Linux server and elevate privileges to another user:

Please be sure to tune back in every two weeks for five new challenges!


For more info or to get started on the Cyber Range, please visit https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/services/cyber-range/