Home Network Design – Part 2

Ethan Robish //


Why Segment Your Network?

Here’s a quick recap from Part 1. A typical home network is flat. This means that all devices are connected to the same router and are on the same subnet. Each device can communicate with every other with no restrictions at the network level.

This network’s first line of defense is a consumer router[1][2]. It also has your smart doorbell[3], door lock[4][5][6], lightbulb[7], and all your other IoT devices[8][9]. Not to mention all your PCs, tablets, and smartphones, which you, of course, keep patched with the latest security updates[10] right? Windows 7 is now unsupported and most mobile devices only receive 2-3 years of OS and security updates at the most. What about devices brought over by guests? Do you make sure those are all up to date as well?

Once an attacker has a foothold on your network, how hard would it be for them to spread to your other devices? Many router vulnerabilities are available for an attacker to exploit from inside the router’s firewall. Your router is the gateway for all your other devices’ internet traffic, opening you up to rogue DNS, rogue routes, or even TLS stripping man-in-the-middle attacks. Some of the most devastating ransomware attacks[11] have spread by exploiting vulnerabilities in services like SMB or through password authentication to accessible systems on the same network segment. Speaking of passwords, yours are all at least 15 characters (preferably random) right[12]? Ransomware is also known to try default or common passwords and even attempt brute forcing[13]. You might as well make sure that you have multi-factor authentication enabled where you can because malware can also steal passwords from your browser and email[14]

[1]: https://threatpost.com/threatlist-83-of-routers-contain-vulnerable-code/137966/

[2]: https://routersecurity.org/bugs.php

[3]: https://threatpost.com/ring-plagued-security-issues-hacks/151263/

[4]: https://www.cnet.com/news/smart-lock-has-a-security-vulnerability-that-leaves-homes-open-for-attacks/

[5]: https://techcrunch.com/2019/07/02/smart-home-hub-flaws-unlock-doors/

[6]: https://threatpost.com/smart-lock-turns-out-to-be-not-so-smart-or-secure/146091/

[7]: https://www.theverge.com/2020/2/5/21123491/philips-hue-bulb-hack-hub-firmware-patch-update

[8]: https://threatpost.com/half-iot-devices-vulnerable-severe-attacks/153609/

[9]: https://threatpost.com/?s=iot

[10]: https://www.it.ucla.edu/security/resources/security-best-practices/top-10-it-security-recommendations

[11]: https://www.wired.com/story/notpetya-cyberattack-ukraine-russia-code-crashed-the-world/

[12]: https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/?s=password

[13]: https://www.zdnet.com/article/ransomware-attacks-weak-passwords-are-now-your-biggest-risk/

[14]: https://www.zdnet.com/article/ftcode-ransomware-is-now-armed-with-browser-email-password-stealing-features/

Segmentation means separating your devices so that they cannot freely communicate with each other. This may be completely isolating them or only allowing certain traffic but blocking everything else.

How does segmentation help combat the issues outlined above? The first thing to realize is that no one is perfect. Even if you are security conscious and actively work to fix issues, there are always going to be security vulnerabilities and weaknesses. 

  • You may be running IoT devices that you have no control over whether the manufacturer patches security issues. 
  • You may own mobile devices that no longer receive updates. 
  • You may have devices with default passwords set simply because you didn’t realize there was a default account added.

Once we realize that we can’t be perfect, the idea of having different layers of security and practicing defense in depth starts making sense.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defense_in_depth_(computing)

You likely already have some layers implemented.

  • Your edge firewall on your home router keeps random inbound traffic out.
  • Your personal devices may have software firewalls activated.
  • Your devices may have authentication enforced to prevent anonymous usage.
  • You could have anti-virus software that keeps common and known malware from infecting your system.

Each of these layers is fallible, but adding more layers makes it harder and harder for an attacker to craft an exploit path that bypasses all of them. They can also limit the damage should one layer be compromised. For instance, say an attacker somehow broke through your edge firewall. Your security layers could prevent or delay further compromise into other devices. Network segmentation is an excellent layer to add to your defense in depth strategy.


Approaches To Network Segmentation

You can think of segmentation on a linear scale. 

On one end of the scale, every device is on the same network. This is the same as no segmentation, but everything is interoperable (including malware). You don’t need instructions on setting this up because it is the default in every networking device on the planet. This is like a bowl of candy where every piece can freely move around and touch all the others.

On the other end of the scale, every device is completely isolated from each other. This is similar to giving every device a public IP address and making it available on the internet. This isn’t as crazy as it sounds as IPv6 makes this completely possible and it forces you to treat everything as untrusted. Everything has firewall rules only allowing certain services to be accessed. The services that are accessible enforce authentication and encryption (likely SSO and TLS). This is similar to a box of chocolate where every piece is isolated from the others.

Notably Google has implemented this in what they call BeyondCorp.

https://cloud.google.com/beyondcorp

https://security.googleblog.com/2019/06/how-google-adopted-beyondcorp.html

https://thenewstack.io/beyondcorp-google-ditched-virtual-private-networking-internal-applications/

Google’s BeyondCorp has research papers for guidance and solutions to craft your own implementation, provided you use Google’s cloud for everything.

Cloudflare created a product that operates on a similar idea but can be used anywhere, rather than requiring you to migrate everything into a cloud environment. This is a paid product, but the free tier may well work for home networks.

https://blog.cloudflare.com/introducing-cloudflare-access/

https://blog.cloudflare.com/cloudflare-access-now-teams-of-any-size-can-turn-off-their-vpn/

https://teams.cloudflare.com/access/index.html

As I mentioned, network segmentation is a scale. This post will fall somewhere in the middle between these extremes. Keeping with the candy analogies, our goal is to group similar pieces together into separate containers.

The challenge is to determine the best balance between simplicity, interoperability, and security for you.


Network Segmentation Concepts

In order to get segmentation, you need your packets to traverse a device that can apply some sort of filtering. Much of my confusion when setting up my own network stemmed from the fact that this happens at different layers of the OSI model, with different concepts overlapping or working together. If these concepts are new to you, see the “Terminology” section of my previous posts: 

https://www.blackhillsinfosec.com/home-network-design-part-1

  • Switch – A managed switch can implement separate LAN segments through software configuration. These are called virtual LANs or VLANs. Managed switches can have rules that limit traffic between different ethernet ports. These are called port Access Control Lists (ACLs). Layer 3 switches also have VLAN ACLs that filter traffic between VLANs (VACLs). These are basically limited firewall rules implemented in switches. They aren’t as flexible as software firewalls and only apply to OSI layers 3 and below, but they have the benefit of better performance compared to a firewall.
  • Router – Routers must have routes configured, either automatically through a route discovery protocol or statically set. Routes are used in order to allow IP traffic to pass between different network subnets. Conversely, if a route is not present then no traffic will flow between those subnets. You might be tempted to call this a security feature and use it as such, but I advise against that. Routers will often automatically create routes between networks and there are entire protocols devoted to learning and sharing routes between routers (e.g. OSPF, EIGRP, RIP). If you rely on the absence of a rule for security you might find your router has betrayed you by adding it for you and breaking your deliberate segmentation.
  • Firewall – This is the most flexible of all the options and can operate on OSI layers 3 through 7. But in most networks, this means that packets will have to pass through both switch hardware and routing hardware before making it to a CPU which applies the firewall filtering. Switches have specialized hardware and process packets extremely quickly. Any time a packet can’t be handled by a switch alone it will add extra resource load on the next device and add extra latency. Without the decisions made by switches, a firewall’s CPU could easily become overloaded on a large network. Even a single physical device that functions as a switch, router, and firewall all wrapped up in one will most likely have specialized hardware inside for switching. As a wise uncle once said, 

This doesn’t even cover all the available options. In addition, there is wireless client isolation, virtual routing and forwarding (VRF), and along with others that I don’t even know about. Finding the right combination of these concepts is a balance between your configuration needs, your available equipment, and your throughput requirements.

What I have above should get you through this post but if you are interested, here are some further resources:


Deciding What To Put In Each Segment

Devices on the same network segment will be able to talk to each other freely with no (network) firewall restrictions, or potentially only the ACLs which your managed switch can enforce. Additionally, broadcast and multicast traffic will be available to all the devices on the segment. Whereas, devices on different segments can talk to each other using unicast traffic within the bounds of router routes and firewall rules.

If you are security-minded (a likely assumption since you’re reading this blog) then you might be tempted to isolate each of your devices and open firewall rules one by one as needed. Or to create a multitude of segments with a few devices in each. This is a decent approach if you have the resources and time to dedicate to this. But I’ll give you the benefit of my experience as to why I think simpler is better. As you get more complex, you increase the setup and maintenance burden. Not only does this take more time and energy, but you also run the risk of losing the security benefits you were after due to creating something more complex than what you currently understand. 

There is a reason this post is written in 2020 while part one of this series was in 2017. After I wrote part one I grouped my 21 devices into 10 different types, created a spreadsheet, and assigned them into 8 segments. Even then I realized this was too many and ended up implementing 6 segments. I spent too much time trying to get devices to work together, pruning and merging certain segments over time in frustration. 

The final straw was after I had visitors connected to my guest wireless network and noticed that the dynamic IP addresses they had gotten didn’t look right. I investigated and discovered that somewhere along the way I had completely blown the separation I thought I had between my home devices and guest devices. At this point, I decided to tear everything down and start from scratch: to build something up that I could fully understand rather than trying to patch up a design that was overly complex to begin with.


Segmentation Approaches

I came up with two ways to approach network segmentation:

  • Top-Down: Go from one segment to two (then three, etc) by thinking about all my devices and deciding which ones I cared most about and wanted to separate from everything else.  This could simply be wanting all your own devices separate from your guests’ devices. Or it could be wanting your personal computers separate from your media and IoT devices.
  • Bottom-Up: Start with every device separate and think about how to group them together based on similar resource access requirements.

You will likely find a hybrid of the two approaches most useful. At the end of the top-down approach you can use the bottom-approach to continue splitting up your biggest groups and help develop firewall rules. And if you start with the bottom-up approach, you will still likely want to make some high-level group decisions like splitting off your work and guest segments.

The primary reason we are implementing network segmentation is for security. It is easy to get lost in the weeds so one piece of advice is to keep the end goal of compartmentalizing services and data in mind.


Top-Down Approach

Start with all of your devices in one group and identify groups to break out based on your needs. It is called top-down because you are going from general (one group) to specific (multiple groups). This is the approach I took most recently and ended up with a network that was simpler to configure and simpler to manage. I recommend taking this approach to start with.

  1. List out all client devices.
  2. Decide which devices you’ll need to segment at a minimum. For instance, work devices and guest devices must be on their own segments.
  3. Group your devices under each category.
    1. Work
    2. Guest
    3. Home

You can start with these segments, or you can divide them up further if you can easily identify additional groups of devices. For instance, you might decide that you have several Home devices that only need internet access and nothing else. You could choose to connect these to your Guest segment, or you could create a separate segment called Internet Only.

This approach is meant for simplicity and if you start getting too granular you will benefit from reading through the considerations needed for the bottom-up approach.


Example

Let’s walk through a real-world example where the primary goals are to separate work devices from home devices and provide a guest network.

You can do this a number of ways. I’ll use a spreadsheet, but you can use pen and paper, lists in a document, or a kanban (e.g. Trello) board.

  1. List out all client devices in the first column.
  2. In the first row create a new column for each of your must-have segments (e.g. Work, Guest).
  3. Mark your devices in each segment.
DeviceHomeWorkGuest
NASx

Desktopx

ThinkPad
x
MacBook 13″x

MacBook 15″x

Surfacex

iPhone 8x

Pixel 3x

Galaxy S4x

iPhone SEx

Kindle Firex

Xbox Onex

Shield TVx

Brother Printerx

HD HomeRunx

In this case, I’m reserving the Guest group for anyone who visits my house and brings a phone or laptop of their own. If I get any additional work devices in the future, those will also go in the Workgroup.

I could take this further if I wanted to. Let’s say that some of my devices don’t need access to anything local and that they only ever talk to the internet. I’ve also decided to put my home server into its own group.

DeviceHomeWorkServerInternet OnlyGuest
NAS

x

Desktop


x
ThinkPad
x


MacBook 13″


x
MacBook 15″x



Surfacex



iPhone 8x



Pixel 3x



Galaxy S4x



iPhone SE


x
Kindle Firex



Xbox Onex



Android TVx



Brother Printerx



HD HomeRunx



Remember that we have several tools at our disposal to limit traffic:

  • VLANs
  • Port ACLs
  • Wireless Isolation
  • Firewall Rules

If I keep this in mind, I can start seeing that I’ll need to put in firewall rules to allow each group access to certain services on my home server. While I could consider connecting my Internet Only devices to my Guest network and implement wireless client isolation, I would prefer to keep them separate. Sharing the network password with other devices introduces a risk of eavesdropping. Furthermore, Windows 10 has been known to share wireless credentials with the user’s contact list, meaning your guest wireless network key could make it into the hands of your friends’ friends, who you do not know.


Bottom-Up Approach

Start with each of your devices in its own group. You will have as many groups as you have devices. Then start grouping devices together based on specific needs until you can no longer justify merging groups together. I took the bottom-up approach during my first attempt at segmenting my network. My advice if you decide to take this approach is:

  1. Be honest about the skills you have and the amount of time and frustration you are willing to put up with in order to learn what you don’t know.
  2. Keep grouping an extra step and decide which device groups you would merge together next. This can save you some trouble if you run into unexpected issues. You may even decide that you like the groups you end up with here better and use them.

My steps for the bottom-up approach are:

  1. List out all client devices.
  2. Mark devices which will run a server that needs to be accessed by other devices.
  3. Mark devices for which local auto-discovery is necessary to function. If you have the option of inputting the IP address manually in your application and are willing to do that, there’s no need to have the auto-discovery features.
  4. For each device, you identified as a server, go through all your other devices and determine which ones will need access.
  5. For each device you identified with auto-discovery, go through all your other devices and determine which ones need to auto-discover it.

A Quick Note About Service Discovery And Multicast DNS

Printers, Chromecasts, and home automation devices often use multicast traffic to perform service auto-discovery, specifically, multicast DNS (mDNS), though other multicast-based protocols are sometimes used. Multicast traffic does not cross network segments (technically broadcast domains) without extra configuration (IGMP) and the multicast used by mDNS requires a repeater service in order to cross network segments.

For example, I have a network TV tuner that requires an app to connect and watch TV. The app will automatically detect the tuner with no way to manually enter its IP address. It relies on multicast traffic which means I have to keep it on the same network as all the devices I expect to use it with.  Other examples of devices you might run into are screen mirroring (e.g. Chromecast), speakers (e.g. Sonos), file shares (e.g. Apple Time Capsule), and printing. 

Some devices may appear to use auto-discovery but in reality, use a cloud service to facilitate discovery and management. If you’re not sure if your device relies on local auto-discovery, disconnect your home’s internet connection and try to locate the device in your client application (you may have to remove it first if it was already saved). If it finds it and can connect there’s a good chance it is using some form of auto-discovery. You can also fire up Wireshark and look for mDNS packets (filter: mdns) or use a tool that speaks mDNS to query for services on your network.

In this post, I am choosing the simpler route that requires multicast devices to be on the same network segment, but at the end are some options if you’d like to research a different solution for your specific network setup. 


Example

You can skip this approach if you’re happy with the top-down exercise. But the bottom-up approach can help you create further segmentation and gain a more intimate knowledge of your network devices and services and how they interact, which will help you when it comes time to create firewall rules.

Again, I’ll use a spreadsheet but you can do this with pen and paper, lists in a document, or a kanban (e.g. Trello) board.

  1. List out all client devices in the first column. Also, create an empty Server column and an empty Auto-Discovery column.
  2. Mark all your devices in the Server column which are hosting services that your other devices will need to access.
  3. For all your servers, mark in the Auto-discovery column where auto-discovery functionality is required.
DeviceServerAuto-discovery
NASx
Desktop

ThinkPad

MacBook 13″

MacBook 15″

Surface

iPhone 8

Pixel 3

Galaxy S4

iPhone SE

Kindle Fire

Xbox One

Shield TVxx
Brother Printerx
HD HomeRunxx

In this case, I have 4 devices which are classified as servers on my home network. Of these, only 2 have auto-discovery as a mandatory feature. Auto-discovery would be nice for adding printers, but considering I can manually add the location of a printer and once it’s set up I don’t have to worry about it again I’m fine neutering the auto-discovery feature.

Next, we’re going to expand our table. For every server you marked, make a new column for each service that needs to run. Pay attention here as you might have multiple services hosted on the same system. For instance, my NAS hosts a media server, a fileshare, and a DNS server from the same server so I will make a new column for each of these services. For any services which require auto-discovery, mark the column with (auto).

Here’s what the table looks like now.

DeviceServerAuto-DiscoveryMediaFileshareDNSPrintingTV Tuner (auto)Casting (auto)
NASx






Desktop







ThinkPad







MacBook 13″







MacBook 15″







Surface







iPhone 8







Pixel 3







Galaxy S4







iPhone SE







Kindle Fire







Xbox One







Shield TVxx





Brother Printerx






HD HomeRunxx





Next, go through each service and mark which devices will require access to that service. I used dashes to indicate the server hosting the service.

DeviceMediaFileshareDNSPrintingTV Tuner (auto)Casting (auto)
NAS


Desktop
xx


ThinkPad
xx


MacBook 13″xxxx
x
MacBook 15″xxxxxx
Surfacexxx
xx
iPhone 8x
x
xx
Pixel 3x
x

x
Galaxy S4x
x


iPhone SEx
x


Kindle Firex
x
x
Xbox Onex
x
x
Shield TVx
x
x
Brother Printer
xx

HD HomeRun

x

We won’t necessarily use all these columns to determine what groups to put systems in. But they will come in handy when creating firewall rules later. The columns we do care about are the auto-discovery services since those will need to be on the same segment to function correctly. Unless you use an mDNS repeater (described earlier in this article) then any rows with marks in multiple auto-discovery columns means those services will have to be on the same segment.

Here’s what I mean from the table above:

Even though there are several devices that only need access to one of the services and not the other, the orange highlighted devices (MacBook 15″, Surface, iPhone 8) need access to both services requiring auto-discovery. This means that the TV Tuner and Casting services (served by the Shield TV and HD HomeRun) will need to be on the same network segment along with those client devices. And that means that any other device that needs access to only one of those services will be on that segment as well. In the event that you have some auto-discovery services that do not have overlapping clients, congratulations! You can put these each in their own network segments and keep their respective clients isolated from each other.

At this point we have one network segment for sure that contains all the aforementioned auto-discovery related devices. Since every other service required is unicast we could technically put each of the remaining devices in their own isolated segment and simply manage routes and firewall rules between each of them. This would offer the greatest security in theory. But in practice, this is likely too complex and time-consuming to be worth it. This is why I advised to keep going an extra step and see which devices make sense to group together next.

In the table below, you can see how I’ve rearranged and grouped devices based on similarities in services they require access to. This would simplify firewall configuration as instead of having to require rules for individual devices, I could instead configure firewall rules for an entire segment and any devices in that segment which require access to a certain service goes in that segment. For example, below I could have a “Fileshare” segment and a separate “Media” segment and configure the firewall rules accordingly.

While this is a good exercise to inform firewall rules, it would be a mistake to stop here. Looking at my groups I can see that I still need to have my ThinkPad work machine isolated which means it can’t go on the same segment as the Desktop and Printer. Furthermore, I think I’d like to have the printer isolated in its own segment. Printers aren’t known for having the best security and by putting in a segment by itself I could implement firewall rules that let all other segments reach into the print spooling port but prevent the printer from reaching out to any of my other devices (save for the DNS and Fileshare services it needs). On the other hand, I’m just fine with putting the Galaxy S4 and iPhone SE together in the same segment and creating separate segments for each of them would be overkill.


Accessing Services Across Segments

There are a number of reasons you may want to allow devices to communicate across segments. One scenario is having a separate guest network but you still want to give them access to specific services on a different segment.

First, a warning: you don’t know if the devices your guests bring over are already infected with malware or what they will do once connected to your network. Letting them connect to any of your own devices is a risk. That said, here are some options for dealing with these issues.

  • Just say no. Apologize and tell your guests that printing, casting, etc doesn’t work from your guest network.
  • Add firewall rules that allow the service you want to make available.
    • This works well for unicast traffic but not for multicast traffic. It does mean you will have to manually configure the client to connect by giving it an IP address.
    • You can have your printer, file share, DNS server, etc on a separate segment from your guest network, but you can add an “allow” firewall rule from the guest network to the IP and port of the service you want available. I do this for my local Pi-Hole DNS server since I want my guests to also have the ad-blocking capability. 
    • You should set up authentication on the services so that guests can only access resources you allow them to. For example, if you make a file server available for your guests you don’t want them to have read and write access to all your private documents or backups. Privacy concerns aside, that’s a recipe for disaster if a cryptolocker happens to hitch a ride onto your network on your guest’s device.
  • Set up Guest mode on the Chromecast. This is a feature specific to Chromecasts, though you can check your own device’s documentation to see if it has a similar feature.
  • Use Google Cloud Print. If your printer supports it, you can tie a printer to your Google account and share access with users without being on the same network.
  • Configure multicast routing with IGMP. This does not help for mDNS but can help for other multicast protocols like Simple Service Discovery Protocol (SSDP).
  • Use an mDNS repeater. Some networking equipment has this feature built-in. If yours doesn’t, you have an option of setting up a Linux server that straddles VLANs and runs an mDNS repeater daemon. If you are purchasing new hardware, be sure your specific model supports this feature.

Gathering Hardware

Once you have a plan for which devices to segment from each other, you’ll need to start thinking about implementation. You’ll need to create an inventory of networking gear you already have and what capabilities it has.

At the minimum you’ll need:

  • Firewall and Router (or layer 3 switch). These are most likely going to come in the same device.
  • Managed switch with VLAN capability. This may also come in the same device as the firewall/router, but you may need to get additional ones to add more ports.
  • Enough managed ethernet ports for the number of wired VLANs you want
  • Enough ethernet ports (can be on unmanaged switches) for the number of wired devices you have
  • Wireless Access point capable of creating virtual Access Points with VLAN tags OR enough physical wireless access points for the number of wireless VLANs you want

I gave some recommendations on hardware in Part 1 of this series.


Further Resources

I’m planning at least one more post in this series where I will cover how I implemented the segmentation with my own hardware. I have Mikrotik devices so my configuration will be specific to them, though the concepts should be broadly applicable.

If you’re anxious to get going on your own, here are some resources to get you on the right path.



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